Implicit Insanity

My Creative Endeavors   

an internal dialogue

"A ‘postmodern’ boss insists that he is not a master but just a coordinator of our joint creative efforts, the first among equals; there should be no formalities among us, we should address him by his nickname, he shares a dirty joke with us … but during all this, he remains our master. In such a social link, relations of domination function through their denial: in order to be operative, they have to be ignored."
Slavoj Žižek, In Defense of Lost Causes (via class-struggle-anarchism)

(via nhaler)

— 1 day ago with 214 notes

trinocularvisions:

7knotwind:

 the next time you are engaged in a discussion of critical theory, heavy intellectual or philosophical content— try putting a few of these hand gestures to use…


1. The Dialectic. ‘This is a dialectic and I’m going to explain it.’

Grip imaginary six centimeter object between thumb and forefinger. Rotate wrist ninety degrees, snapping into end position. Smoothly rotate back to start. Repeat up to three times depending on conviction.

Use when expressing a shift from one thing to another. Highly infectious.

2. The Tiny Dialectic. ‘I’m making a very fine distinction’

Follow directions for ‘The Dialectic’ but with thumb and forefinger one centimeter apart. Bring hand toward eyes for closer inspection.

Use when unpacking specific detail, or when too self-conscious to use ‘The Dialectic’ gesture.

3. The Critical Whirl. ‘I’ve read too much Marx and I can’t get my words out’

Circle hand clockwise in a small but rapid motion towards the audience.

Accelerate and repeat until idea unpacked.


The Glossary of Gestures for Critical Discussion
As Observed (in use by their professors, throughout the process of earning their MFA from Goldsmiths) By Jasmine Johnson  & Alice May Williams 

stahhhhhhp

— 1 week ago with 83 notes
#snowpiercer  #not ok 

7knotwind:

 the next time you are engaged in a discussion of critical theory, heavy intellectual or philosophical content— try putting a few of these hand gestures to use…


1. The Dialectic. ‘This is a dialectic and I’m going to explain it.’

Grip imaginary six centimeter object between thumb and forefinger. Rotate wrist ninety degrees, snapping into end position. Smoothly rotate back to start. Repeat up to three times depending on conviction.

Use when expressing a shift from one thing to another. Highly infectious.

2. The Tiny Dialectic. ‘I’m making a very fine distinction’

Follow directions for ‘The Dialectic’ but with thumb and forefinger one centimeter apart. Bring hand toward eyes for closer inspection.

Use when unpacking specific detail, or when too self-conscious to use ‘The Dialectic’ gesture.

3. The Critical Whirl. ‘I’ve read too much Marx and I can’t get my words out’

Circle hand clockwise in a small but rapid motion towards the audience.

Accelerate and repeat until idea unpacked.


The Glossary of Gestures for Critical Discussion
As Observed (in use by their professors, throughout the process of earning their MFA from Goldsmiths) By Jasmine Johnson  & Alice May Williams 

— 1 week ago with 83 notes
#i have so many to add to these 

australian-red-cedar:

being a feminist means changing your behaviour to better support women, not re-labelling everything you do already as ~an empowering statement~

(via mellifiedman)

— 1 week ago with 11354 notes

Robin Williams, 1951-2014

:(

(Source: theworthlesspeon, via 7knotwind)

— 1 week ago with 27400 notes
contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:
Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
Dramatic use of color.
Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.
In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.
One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

contemporaryelfinchild:

nowisthewinter:

peternyc:

Photo of a fight in the Ukranian Parliament or Renaissance painting? 

Slap them all in togas instead of suits and it would perfect

It also follows a pyramidal composition!

However, I would argue that this picture is more Baroque than Renaissance. Notable features of Baroque art are:

  • Images are direct, obvious, and dramatic.
  • Tries to draw the viewer in to participate in the scene.
  • Depictions feel physically and psychologically real. Emotionally intense.
  • Extravagant settings and ornamentation.
  • Dramatic use of color.
  • Dramatic contrasts between light and dark, light and shadow.
  • As opposed to Renaissance art with its clearly defined planes, with each figure placed in isolation from each other, Baroque art has continuous overlapping of figures and elements.
  • Common themes: grandiose visions, ecstasies and conversions, martyrdom and death, intense light, intense psychological moments.

In the baroque, artists strove to evoke aesthetic responses. Now I’m not talking about aesthetic as in “oh thats pretty” I’m talking about aesthetic like that punch in the gut reaction you get to something.

One of the ways this was done was through the depiction of intense emotion which we see in this photograph. compare to Bernini

The picture also displays a wonderful use of chiaroscuro (an effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly or from a particular direction on something) a style used extensively by Caravaggio and other Baroque artists.

 

(via mellifiedman)

— 1 week ago with 28633 notes
#for eliana 
gammacrank:

Game Typography Challenge: Day 12Use your all-time favorite quote. Gabriola and Folks.
/casually files Shiho’s recruitment scene under “scenes that still gut me almost a decade after first viewing”.
 …Red… What does red look like? From youth, I have been destined for life as a song-maiden. The gods gave me no light, though. Perhaps they grew tired of giving it. Yet, is my desiring it such a terrible thing?

gammacrank:

Game Typography Challenge: Day 12
Use your all-time favorite quote. Gabriola and Folks.

/casually files Shiho’s recruitment scene under “scenes that still gut me almost a decade after first viewing”.

…Red… What does red look like? From youth, I have been destined for life as a song-maiden. The gods gave me no light, though. Perhaps they grew tired of giving it. Yet, is my desiring it such a terrible thing?

— 2 weeks ago with 47 notes